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Laser Eye Surgery PreOp® Patient Education

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo Laser-In-Situ Keratomileusis – or LASIK Laser surgery – to correct a vision problem. But what does that actually mean?

The human eye is constructed like a camera … with a clear lens in the front and light-sensitive tissue at the rear. This tissue makes up the retina which acts like photographic film.
Patient Education
In an eye that has perfect vision, light rays passing through the pupil are focused by the lens to fall precisely at the center of the retina. There are many common problems that can affect the eye and prevent light rays from focusing properly on the retina.

Three of these problems, myopia – or nearsightedness; hyperopia – or farsightedness; and astigmatism can often be corrected or reduced with the use of LASIK laser surgery.
Patient Education
Myopia, or nearsightedness, occurs when the shape of the eye is too long or the curve of the cornea is too extreme. In this case, light rays are focused on a point in front of the retina – instead of on the retina itself.

Hyperopia, or farsightedness, occurs when the shape of the eye is too short. In this case, light rays are focused on a point behind the retina.
Astigmatism occurs when the cornea is unevenly curved,
causing light rays to fall off center or not to focus properly at all.
In either case, LASIK laser surgery can be used to flatten all or part of the cornea … allowing your doctor to cause the focal point of light entering the eye to fall more closely to the center of the surface of the retina.

LASIK laser surgery is a relatively simple and nonintrusive procedure that is designed to reduce or eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses. LASIK laser surgery generally does not have any effect on a patient’s overall health and there are no risks in choosing not to have the surgery.

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Your doctor understands that all medical care benefits from close collaboration between physician and patient — so be sure to review, with your doctor, all risks and alternatives and make sure you understand the reasons behind the recommendation for this particular procedure.

Now let’s talk in detail about the procedure your doctor has recommended. That particular recommendation was based on a number of factors:

* the state of your health,

* the severity of your condition,

* an assessment of alternative treatments or procedures and finally,

* the risks associated with doing nothing at all.

And remember, the final decision is up to you. No one can force you to undergo a surgical procedure against your will.

When it comes to treating nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism …
LASIK Laser surgery is a popular option for those who qualify.
The only alternative to surgery is to rely on glasses or contact lenses.

Now I’d like to introduce you to another important member of the medical team — the nurse.

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291 sec.

Achilles Tendon Repair Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo surgery to repair your ruptured Achilles tendon.

But what does that actually mean?

Your Achilles tendon is the connection between the heel and the most powerful muscle group in the body. It is the strongest, largest and thickest tendon in the body. It begins in the mid-leg and descends to the heel.

Unfortunately, the Achilles tendon is extremely susceptible to acute and chronic injury because of the demands it withstands.

When it ruptures, patients feel a “pop” and may feel that they’ve been struck from behind. This is often followed by weakness and pain.
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After allowing a few minutes for the anesthetic to take effect …
an incision will be made in the long axis of the ankle over the injured tendon.
The incision is carried down through the skin, exposing the underlying tendon sheath. Patient Education
The sheath is then opened to reveal the tendon itself and the contained,
damaged Achilles tendon.
The damaged portion of the tendon is then cut away, taking as little tissue as possible, but cutting back to strong, viable tendon fibers.
The surgeon weaves sutures through the tendon fibers in a pattern designed to hold with good strength.
Then the two tendon ends are pulled into contact and tied securely.
Finally, the incisions are closed with sutures.
After sterile dressings are applied, a well-padded splint will be fitted.

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199 sec.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Arthroscopic Repair Surgery PreOp® Patient Education

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Your doctor has told you that you have a torn anterior cruciate ligament in your knee and has recommended arthroscopic surgery in order to repair it. But what does that actually mean?

The knee is one of the most complex and one of the most important joints in your body.

It is made up of bone, ligament and cartilage. Damage to any individual part can dramatically restrict the normal movement of the leg and can even interfere with the ability to walk.

Let’s take a look at the way the knee joint is put together. The femur, or thigh bone, meets the fibula and tibia to create a flexible joint called the knee. Helping to stabilize the knee are the ligaments.
Patient Education
The ligaments in the knee are strong, flexible cords of tissue that hold the bones together. They maintain stability and allow the normal range of motion when you walk or run. The anterior cruciate ligament – or ACL — guides the tibia, or shin bone. It helps keep your feet below your knees and your legs from buckling as you walk.

Twisting or bending the knee during sports or other strenuous activity can damage the ligament.

During an injury, patients often report feeling or even hearing a sudden “pop” in their knee at the exact moment when the ligament tears.

Other symptoms include swelling, restricted movement, pain and even the inability to stand on the affected leg.

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Now it’s time to talk about the actual procedure your doctor has recommended for you.

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth …
… and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to an operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will prepare you for surgery by clipping or shaving your leg. Patient Education
The surgeon will then apply antiseptic solution to the skin around the knee …
… and place a sterile drape around the operative site.
The anesthesiologist will begin to numb the lower body by injecting a drug into the small of your back.
To perform arthroscopic surgery your doctor will make a few small, button-hole sized incisions in the area around the knee. An arthroscope is a very small video camera that your doctor uses to see the inside of your knee and to guide the surgery.
Before your doctor can insert the arthroscope, the surgical team must inject a clear fluid into the joint. This fluid will inflate the interior space, and will help your doctor by providing an unobstructed view and enough room in which to work.
The actual surgical instruments will be inserted through one or more other openings small openings. Your Procedure
After verifying that anterior cruciate ligament — or ACL — has been severed, your doctor will begin the procedure by removing a piece of tissue from the front of the knee. This tissue, or graft, has bone on both ends and a section of tendon stretched between.
Next, the team drills a hole in the end of the thighbone.
And another in the top of the shin. These holes becomes the sockets for the bony ends of the tendon graft taken at the beginning of the procedure.
The ligament graft is then inserted into place.
When the procedure is complete, the team withdraws the instruments …
… and the surgical fluid drains safely from the knee.
Following surgery, sterile dressings are applied. To aid in healing, your knee may be stabilized with a brace.

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The knee is one of the most complex and one of the most important joints in your body.

It is made up of bone, ligament and cartilage. Damage to any individual part can dramatically restrict the normal movement of the leg and can even interfere with the ability to walk.

Let’s take a look at the way the knee joint is put together. The femur, or thigh bone, meets the fibula and tibia to create a flexible joint called the knee. Helping to stabilize the knee are the ligaments.
Patient Education
The ligaments in the knee are strong, flexible cords of tissue that hold the bones together. They maintain stability and allow the normal range of motion when you walk or run. The anterior cruciate ligament – or ACL — guides the tibia, or shin bone. It helps keep your feet below your knees and your legs from buckling as you walk.

Twisting or bending the knee during sports or other strenuous activity can damage the ligament.

During an injury, patients often report feeling or even hearing a sudden “pop” in their knee at the exact moment when the ligament tears.

Other symptoms include swelling, restricted movement, pain and even the inability to stand on the affected leg.

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325 sec.

Hernia – Hiatal Open Repair Surgery PreOp® Patient Education

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo surgery to repair a hiatal hernia. But what does that actually mean?

Your diaphragm is a muscle that separates your chest from your abdomen and helps you to breathe.

Normally, the diaphragm has an opening for the esophagus to pass through where it connects with the stomach.

A hiatal hernia occurs when part of the stomach pushes upward through this small opening.
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Your hiatal hernia may be causing considerable discomfort, with symptoms like heartburn, difficulty swallowing, chest pain and belching. The reasons why hiatal hernias form are not known, but they are quite common.

A hernia is dangerous only if it becomes strangulated. That means that the portion of the stomach that is pushed up into the chest may become pinched – preventing blood from reaching it.

If this happens, you may require emergency surgery to restore blood flow and to repair the hernia.
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Luckily, the vast majority of hernias are not considered to be emergencies. However, if you should ever feel a sudden onset of severe pain in your chest or stomach, you should seek medical attention immediately.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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329 sec.

Small Incision Cataract Surgery PreOp Patient Education

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo lens replacement surgery to treat a cataract. But what does that actually mean?

The human eye is constructed like a camera – with a clear lens in the front. The lens is located just behind the iris. It is contained in an elastic capsule. This capsule will serve as the housing for the new lens. All light that enters the eye has to pass through this lens.

As we age, this lens can become cloudy and gradually lose its ability to focus properly. This is called a cataract.If left untreated, a cataract can grow steadily worse – interfering more and more with your vision.
Generally, replacing a cataract with an artificial lens is a simple procedure.

It usually involves a single incision in the white of the eye. Through this single opening the cataract is removed and the artificial lens is inserted.

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By now, the pupil will be fully open, or dilated.
When the operative field is numb, the surgeon will use the microscope to help make a very small incision just 3 millimeters above the iris. The lens is located just behind the iris contained in the elastic capsule.
Next the surgeon will open the top of the capsule and remove the lens. Most likely, your doctor will use a small probe which vibrates at a high frequency.
The probes vibrations break the old lens into microscopic pieces …
which can then be drawn out with gentle suction.
Through the small incision, the surgeon will then insert the new lens.
The lens is actually rolled up inside a special injector, designed to fit through the small incision made above the iris.
With the tip of the injector inside the eye, the surgeon slowly injects the new lens where it unfolds into position.
Because of the small size of the incision, often your surgeon will complete surgery without putting in any stitches.
Vision will gradually improve during normal healing over a period of 5 to 8 weeks.

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234 sec.

Endoscopy – Upper GI Surgery PreOp® Patient Education

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Your doctor has recommended that you have an upper GI endoscopy. But what does that actually mean?

An upper GI endoscopy is a diagnostic procedure used by your doctor to inspect the inside of your throat, esophagus, stomach and upper intestine.

While it’s considered a surgical procedure, endoscopy does not involve an incision. Instead, your doctor will pass a flexible tube, called an endoscope through your mouth and into your stomach and digestive tract.

This tube has a tiny video camera mounted on its tip,

it also contains a small tool used for taking tissue samples.

Because the passageway from the mouth to the opening of the small intestine is usually unobstructed, your doctor can use the endoscope to inspect the entire upper half of your digestive system.

Reasons for undergoing an upper GI endoscopy vary. You may have been suffering from one or more of a number symptoms – including weight loss, abdominal pain, chronic heartburn or indigestion, gastritis, hiatal hernia, trouble swallowing, pain caused by an ulcer or other problems associated with the stomach and digestive system.

Some gastrointestinal symptoms can be warning signs of serious medical problems and you should take your doctor’s recommendation to have an endoscopy very seriously.

Luckily, the vast majority of medical problems diagnosed by endoscopy are treatable and you should look forward to improved health and comfort as a result of the information gathered during the procedure.

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On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown,
you may receive a sedative by mouth
and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table, and positioned comfortably on your left side.
A nurse will begin preparation by spraying a liquid anesthetic into your throat.
To help you hold your mouth open, a small mouth piece will be placed between your teeth.

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To create a better viewing area, your stomach will be filled with a small quantity of air which may cause you to have a feeling of fullness.
After a few minutes, your mouth and throat will feel numb.
The doctor will then insert the endoscope into your mouth and gently guide it towards your stomach and small intestine.
To better examine abnormal-looking tissues, your doctor may choose to take one or more biopsies. Patient Education
Small instruments sent through the interior of the endoscope are able to painlessly remove small samples of tissue with a small scissor like tool by simply snipping them free.
After a thorough exam,
The endoscope is carefully removed… and the support piece is taken out of your mouth.
Any tissue specimens removed during the procedure will be sent immediately to a lab for microscopic analysis. Your doctor will tell you when to expect results from those tests.
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276 sec.

Knee Replacement Surgery, PreOp® Patient Education

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Before we talk about treatment, let’s start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition.

You doctor has recommended that you undergo knee replacement surgery. But what exactly does that mean?
The knee is one of the most complex and one of the most important joints in your body.
Let’s take a look at the way the knee joint works.
The knee is made up of four bones. The femur, which is the large bone in your thigh,
… attaches by ligaments to your tibia.
Just below and next to the tibia is the fibula, which runs parallel to the tibia.
The patella, or what we call the knee cap, rides on the knee joint as the knee bends.
When the knee becomes diseased due to arthritis or other injury the bones rub together causing pain and can even restricting the ability to walk.
No matter what the cause, one of the most effective ways to fix a damaged knee is to replace it surgically. Patient Education
In this procedure, the ends of the femur, tibia and patella are replaced with a metal joint which restores freedom of movement.
Knee surgery is a major operation, but your doctor believes that the procedure –followed up with physical therapy and time to heal — will result in reduced pain and greater mobility.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth …
… and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will begin preparation by shaving your leg.
The surgeon will then apply antiseptic solution to the skin …
… and place a sterile drape around the operative site.
Next, the anesthesiologist will administer anesthesia by injection and using an inhalation mask. Patient Education
After you are unconscious,
… your doctor will make a vertical incision in your leg above your knee.
Using retractors to pull back the skin,
… the surgeon will make a second incision in the muscle …
… in order to expose the damaged knee joint.
Next, your doctor will remove the patella, or knee cap,
… and flex your leg to expose the surface of the joint.
Preparing the surface of the joint involves removing the damaged or diseased parts of the bone …PreOp® Patient Education
… and then cutting and shaping the surface to allow the best fit possible for the artificial joint.
Once your doctor is satisfied with this preparation, the team will drill holes in the femur and tibia.
They will also prepare the inside surface of the knee cap, and then coat the bony surfaces with a special cement.
The metal pieces of the new joint are then installed on the tibia and femur,
… as well as the knee cap pad. PreOp® Patient Education
Finally, your doctor places a spacer on the tibia surface.
After a final check to make sure all components fit and that the leg can move freely,
… the muscle and other tissues are closed with sutures.
Following surgery, sterile dressings are applied.
To aid in healing, your knee may be stabilized with a brace and you will be encouraged to use crutches during the recovery process.

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295 sec.

Breast Biopsy Needle Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Before we talk about treatment, let’s start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition.

Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure – using a hollow needle to sample a portion of a lump or thickening in the breast. But what does that actually mean?

Biopsy is a general term which simply means “the removal of tissue for microscopic examination.”

Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast – not because you’re necessarily ill – but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue.

Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer.

In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch.

Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram – or breast x-ray. Let’s take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue.

The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue – all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them.

Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention.

A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt.

The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy.

In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it.

Most likely, you’re feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it’s natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear.

But ignoring a lump in your breast won’t make it go away.

If you’re feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body – so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible.

If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you’ll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems.

If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you’ll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked – you might be putting your own life at risk.

The bottom line – trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don’t be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns.

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You will then be transferred to the operating table.

Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the needle will be inserted.

Then, the doctor will place a sterile drape or towels around the operative site…

and will inject a local anesthetic. This will sting a bit, but your breast will quickly begin to feel numb. Usually, the surgeon will inject more than one spot – in order to make sure that the entire area is thoroughly numb

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259 sec.

Bunion Removal Foot Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo surgery to remove a bunion.
But what does that actually mean?

A bunion is caused when the metatarsal bone in the big toe gradually shifts towards the second toe.

This shift causes a bump at the inside of the big toe’s first joint. As a bunion grows, it can lead to other painful foot problems, including hammertoes, calluses on the bottom of the foot and arch pain.

Bunions are largely hereditary, but they can effect anyone. Even a small instability in the bones of the big toe can trigger the growth of a bunion.
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A bunion does not generally lead to other health problems, but left untreated it can eventually limit the ability to walk.

Luckily, bunions can be treated with a fairly simple surgical procedure.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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Bunion surgery only rarely leads to complications.
One is a persistent residual neuralgia – or pain – around the scar.
It can be either localized or general. It may develop soon after surgery – or even weeks or months later.
Other complications include excessive bleeding, slow healing or a recurrence of the bunion.
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Once you return home, you will be responsible to keeping the dressing intact and clean.

As with all surgery, you should be alert for signs of infection near the incision – increased swelling, redness, bleeding or other discharge. Your doctor may advise you to be on the alert for other symptoms as well. If you experience any unusual symptoms, report them to your doctor right away.
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You may also notice some bruising in the general area of the incision. The discoloration may be extensive – but as with any bruise, it should heal on it’s own.

Before you leave, you’ll be given discharge guidelines which may include diet, medication, work and other activity restrictions.

You’ll also make at least one follow-up appointment so that the doctor will be able to check the healing of the incision and/or to remove sutures.
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This program has been designed to help you to understand a surgical procedure and to empower you to be an active participant in your own care. We hope that you take the time to discuss alternative treatments with your doctor and that you learn as much as you can about your own particular medical situation.

We also want to make sure that you understand all the risks of surgery and potential complications which can follow – no matter how unlikely they may be.
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It’s important that you understand exactly what the procedure entails – including the risks, benefits and alternative treatments – before you decide to proceed.

Always remember that the final decision to go ahead or not is up to you.

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242 sec.

Hysterectomy, Removal of Uterus, Ovaries and Fallopian Tubes SurgeryPreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you have a hysterectomy with the removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes. But what does that actually mean?

Hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus – the organ that holds and protects the fetus during pregnancy.

Hysterectomy often also involves the removal of other parts of the reproductive system, including the ovaries – where eggs are produced – the fallopian tubes which carry the eggs to the uterus and the cervix – or neck of the uterus.

There are many different reasons why a doctor may recommend this kind of surgery.
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In many cases, disease or the growth of abnormal tissue will lead a doctor to recommend the removal of the uterus, the ovaries and fallopian tubes.
In some cases, unusually heavy menstrual flow and the accompanying discomfort may make hysterectomy an important treatment option for patient and physician to consider.

But no matter what the reason behind it, you should be aware that the removal of the uterus and other reproductive organs is a serious step and it can mean significant changes in your life.
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After having a hysterectomy, you will not be able to have children and if because your ovaries are removed as part of the procedure, you may even need to take medication to replace hormones that your body once produced on its own.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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244 sec.

Mastectomy Modified RadicalPreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you have a modified radical mastectomy. But what does that actually mean?

Traditionally, a Radical Mastectomy called for the removal of the breast, surrounding tissue and even the chest muscle below.

A Modified Radical Mastectomy is a procedure in which the breast and surrounding tissue are removed, while leaving the chest muscle intact. In most cases, mastectomy is required in order to remove cancerous tissue from the body. The extent of tissue removed is determined by the amount of cancer present in your body.

A Modified Radical Mastectomy is one the most extensive forms of breast cancer surgery in that it calls for the complete removal not only of the breast, but of the lymph nodes as well.

Lymph nodes are small junctions that join the vessels that make up the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system circulates a bodily fluid called lymph in the same way that the circulatory system carries blood.

Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a modified radical mastectomy because the cancer in your breast may have begun to move into the lymph nodes under your arm as well as into your chest muscle.

This procedure will permanently change the outward shape and appearance of your chest.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth …
… and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will begin preparation by clipping or shaving your underarm.Patient Education
The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia – most probably general anesthesia by injection and inhalation mask.
The surgeon will then apply an antiseptic solution to the skin …
… and place a sterile drape around the operative site.
Two incisions will be made beginning at the middle of the chest …
– one along the top and one along the bottom of the breast – coming together just under the arm.Patient Education
The skin is then lifted up and away, revealing the tissue underneath.
Beginning at the clavicle – or collar bone – the surgeon then begins to carefully cut the breast tissue away from the muscles that lie just beneath.
When the breast has been completely freed, it is lifted away, exposing the top layer of muscle, called the pectoralis major.
The surgeon will pull this muscle temporarily aside exposing the next layer of muscle – the pectoralis minor.
The surgeon will move this muscle aside, creating a clear view of the surrounding fatty tissue.Patient Education
Within this fat deposit lie lymph nodes lymph vessels, blood vessels and nerves.
Using great care not to damage the large thoracic nerve, your doctor will remove the lymph nodes and surrounding fat.
Blood vessels will be tied off and your doctor will thoroughly examine the surrounding tissues for any other signs of disease.
When the surgical team is satisfied that they have done all that they can to remove the cancer, they will release the muscles and other tissue.
One or more drainage tubes will be temporarily inserted at the site while the healing process begins.
They will then close the incision.
Finally, a sterile bandage is applied.

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333 sec.

Shoulder Replacement Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has told you that need to undergo shoulder replacement surgery. But what does that actually mean?

As you move your arm, the ball-shaped end of the upper arm, or humerus, moves against a cup-like depression in shoulder bone, or scapula.
As long as the upper arm can slide against the shoulder, you are able to move your arm comfortably. But over time, especially in patients who suffer from arthritis, the shoulder joint can wear down.

Cartilage, the tissue that cushions the bones and makes it possible for them to move smoothly against each other can wear away.

When this happens, the bones run together, causing pain and restricting arm movement. No matter what the cause, one of the most effective ways to fix a damaged shoulder is to replace it surgically.

In this procedure, the ball-shaped bone at the top of the upper arm is removed …
… and replaced with a metal substitute.

The shoulder socket is widened and lined with a smooth pad that allows the metal ball joint to move more freely against the shoulder blade.
Shoulder replacement surgery is a major operation, but your doctor believes that the procedure — followed up with physical therapy and time to heal — will result in reduced pain and greater mobility.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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Now it’s time to talk about the actual procedure your doctor has recommended for you.

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth …
… and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to an operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will prepare by clipping or shaving the skin around the shoulder.Patient Education
The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia – most probably general anesthesia by injection and inhalation mask.
The surgeon will then apply an antiseptic solution to the skin …
… and place a sterile drape around the operative site.
Then, when you are asleep, the surgical team will make an incision over the shoulder.
The team will pull the skin aside to reveal the muscle tissue below. They’ll then make another incision to reveal the shoulder joint.
Next, the team pulls the top of the arm bone out of the shoulder socket.
Using a precision surgical saw, your doctor will carefully remove the ball-shaped end of the upper arm.
Then, the surgical team will use a high-speed drill to hollow out the top of the arm bone.
A specially fitted artificial ball joint slides into the top of the arm bone.
Next, your doctor will smooth the inner surface of the shoulder socket.
Once the socket has been thoroughly cleaned, the artificial lining will be secured in place.Patient Education
The artificial ball joint is turned inward and fit into the socket… and the team carefully checks to make sure that it fits and allows the full range of normal motion.
Muscle and other tissues are closed over the joint using dissolvable stitches. A temporary draining tube may be added.
Finally, the skin is closed with sutures …
… and protected with sterilized strips.
263 sec.

Gastric Adjustable Band Laparoscopic Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo Laparoscopic Gastric – Adjustable Band Surgery. But what exactly does that mean?

Laparoscopic Gastric – Adjustable Band is a surgical procedure used to help a patient lose weight.

It is usually recommended to help those who are morbidly obese – meaning that their weight problem has become a serious health risk.

Most severely overweight patients overeat. Food enters the body through the mouth, travels down the esophagus where it collects in the stomach.

From there, digested food passes into the small intestine. Nutrients taken from the food pass from the small intestine into the bloodstream.

Waste travels to the colon and leaves the body through the anus.

The amount of food that a person eats is partly controlled by appetite. The stomach plays an important role in controlling appetite. When the stomach is empty, a person feels the urge to eat. When the stomach is full, that urge goes away. An adjustable band dramatically reduces the size of the stomach.
With a smaller stomach, the patient is physically unable to eat large amounts of food.

With less food entering the body, fat stores begin to be used. The patient loses weight.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

Patient Education CompanyThen, when you are asleep, the surgical team will make an incision just above the navel.
A tube-shaped collar called a trocar will be placed inside the incision to hold it open.
Harmless carbon dioxide gas will be used to inflate the abdomen, serving to enlarge the work area and to separate the organs.
The team then inserts the laparoscope.
Once in place, the laparoscope will provide video images that allow the surgeon to see the inside of your abdomen.
Next, the team makes four more incisions – taking special care to keep the openings as small as possible. These openings will provide access for other surgical instruments.
Once the team has a clear view of the stomach, your doctor will insert a special tube into your mouth and throat. The surgical team guides the tube into your abdomen until the tip reaches the top of the stomach.
At the tip of the tube there is a balloon. Your doctor will inflate the balloon when it is in position. Using the position of the balloon as a guide, your doctor will create a space around the stomach.
Next, the team will insert an adjustable band into the abdomen.
After deflating the balloon, your doctor will guide the band until it circles the top of the stomach.
Once the band is in place, the team will check the position by re-inflating the balloon.
After making any final adjustments to the position of the band, your doctor will tighten and lock it into place. Next, the team will fill the band with saline solution causing it to further tighten around the stomach.
To keep the band in place, a portion of the stomach will be pulled over the band and secured with 4 or 5 stitches. The remaining portion of the tube used to pass saline into the band will be trimmed and a special valve will be attached.
The valve will be sutured into place just below the skin in the upper left area of the abdomen. This valve will allow your doctor to adjust the tightness of the band and control the size of the opening into your stomach.
When the team is satisfied that the band is properly functioning,
… they will withdraw all surgical instruments and close the incisions with sutures or staples.
Finally, a sterile dressing is applied.

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361 sec.

Arthroscopic Meniscus Repair of Knee PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you have arthroscopic surgery in order to repair a torn meniscus in your knee. But what does that actually mean?

The knee is one of the most important and one of the most complex joints in your body.

It is made up of bone, ligament and cartilage. Damage to any individual part can dramatically restrict the normal movement of the leg and can even interfere with the ability to walk.

Let’s take a look at the way the knee is put together. The femur, or thigh bone, meets the tibia to create a flexible joint called the knee.

Helping to stabilize the knee are flexible bands of tissue called ligaments.

Protecting the bony surfaces that rub together, are pads of tissue called cartilage.

Cartilage acts like a cushion. Without it, every time you bend at the knee, you would cause the major bones of the leg to grind together.

The meniscus is cartilage that not only protects the bone, but also acts like the leg’s shock absorber.

Twisting or bending the knee during sports or even normal activity can damage the meniscus.

Symptoms include swelling, restricted movement, pain and even the inability to stand on the effected leg.

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On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth and
an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will begin preparation by clipping or shaving your leg.
The surgeon will then apply antiseptic solution to the skin around the knee…
… and then place a sterile drape around the operative site.
The anesthesiologist will begin to numb the lower body by injecting a drug into the small of your back.

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Before your doctor can insert the arthroscope,
the surgical team will inject a clear fluid into the joint. This fluid will inflate the interior space, and will help your doctor by providing an unobstructed view. Patient Education
Once in place the arthroscope…
will provide video images …
so the surgeon can insert the instruments through one or more small openings.
After inspecting the extent of the damage to the meniscus, your doctor will repair the meniscus with tiny staples,
…or remove it altogether.
Finally, all the instruments are withdrawn…
and the clear fluid is allowed to drain from the knee.
Following surgery, sterile dressings are applied. To aid in healing, your knee may be stabilized with a brace and you will be encouraged to use crutches during the recovery process.

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244 sec.

Myomectomy Vaginal Fibroid Removal PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your gynecologist has recommended that you undergo surgery to remove vaginal fibroids. But what does that actually mean?

The uterus is part of a woman’s reproductive system – it’s the organ that contains and protects a growing fetus during pregnancy.

Fibroids are non-cancerous tumors that grow from the inner or outer wall of the uterus. They are quite common – as many as 20% of women over 30 will develop fibroids sometime during their lifetimes.

In most cases fibroids do not cause any discomfort and are never detected. Occasionally, however, fibroid tumors can cause problems. Complications from fibroid growth can include:

* Pressure on the urinary system.
* Pressure on the intestines.
* Interference with the reproductive system
* Or infection.

Because these tumors can grow to be very large, surgery is usually recommended in order to restore health and to protect the uterus.

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On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth…
and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table.
To perform this procedure, your doctor will need unobstructed access to your uterus, so your feet will be raised, separated and placed in canvas slings – holding your legs in a position much like that position used during a routine gynecological exam. To begin, your genital area will be clipped or shaved …Patient Education
and swabbed with an antiseptic solution …
and sterile towels are draped around until only the vulva is exposed.
Then the surgeon will use a gloved hand to conduct a vaginal examination and will check the size and location of the uterus by pressing on your lower abdomen.
Your doctor will then use a retractor to open the vagina.
Once the cervix is visible, a forceps is used to grasp the front lip of the cervix …
and to pull it forward – causing the uterus to open.
Through that opening, your doctor will insert an instrument called a hysteroscope.
A hysteroscope allows the surgical team to insert all necessary optical and surgical instruments into the uterus. Patient Education
At the beginning of the procedure, a harmless gas or fluid will be introduced into the uterus, causing it to expand.
By inflating the uterus slightly, your doctor is better able to reach the operative site.
Next, a wire loop is inserted. This loop is used to grab the fibroid tissue and snip it free from the muscular wall of the uterus. Patient Education
When your doctor is satisfied that all fibrous tissue has been removed,
the hysteroscope and all other instruments are withdrawn. The gas or fluid is allowed to escape …
and the uterus returns to its normal shape.

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353 sec.

Breast Biopsy Incisional Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention.

A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt.

The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy.

Sometimes you will have breast changes that can not be felt by physical examination alone; but may be seen on a mammogram.

In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it.

Most likely, you’re feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it’s natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear.

But ignoring a lump in your breast won’t make it go away.

If you’re feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body – so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible.

If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you’ll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems.

If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you’ll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked – you might be putting your own life at risk.

The bottom line – trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don’t be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns.

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Before we talk about treatment, let’s start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition.

Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure – or lumpectomy. But what does that actually mean?

Biopsy is a general term which simply means “the removal of tissue for microscopic examination.”

Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast – not because you’re necessarily ill – but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue.

Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer.

In your case, you have lump or thickening in your breast.

It was felt by you or your doctor during a routine breast exam or discovered following a mammogram. Let’s take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue.

The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue – all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny-milk carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them.

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239 sec.

Rotator Cuff Repair Open Suregry PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you have surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff. But what does that actually mean?

Rotator cuff is the term given to describe a group of four tendons that work together to support and stabilize the shoulder joint.
Each tendon connects muscle to bone.

When a shoulder muscles contracts, it pulls on a tendon which in turn pulls on the upper arm bone and causes it to move.

When one or more of these tendons become damaged, the arm loses strength and mobility.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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Your doctor understands that all medical care benefits from close collaboration between physician and patient — so be sure to review, with your doctor, all risks and alternatives and make sure you understand the reasons behind the recommendation for this particular procedure.

Now let’s talk in detail about the procedure your doctor has recommended. That particular recommendation was based on a number of factors:

* the state of your health,

* the severity of your condition,

* an assessment of alternative treatments or procedures and finally,

* the risks associated with doing nothing at all.
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And remember, the final decision is up to you. No one can force you to undergo a surgical procedure against your will.

The choice of treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on kind of damage that has occurred as well as the state of your health and the condition of the rotator cuff tendons themselves.
Often, rest and medication are prescribed following an injury to the shoulder.
But surgery is often the only solution that can restore strength and mobility to torn tendons.
Your doctor has recommended surgery because he or she believes that it is the best alternative for you.
It is important to understand that the success of this procedure will depend on the health of the tendons in your shoulder.
If damage has been caused by deterioration due to age or a disease process, repairing the tendon may not restore full strength and mobility, though the procedure may relieve some chronic pain.
It is possible, in rare cases, that your doctor could learn during the operation that your rotator cuff is not healthy enough to tolerate this operation. In that case you will wake up having undergone surgery, but not the repair of the ligament.
Of course, no surgery is completely risk free. But your physician believes that if you decide not to undergo the recommended procedure, your quality of life will not improve …
… and your ability to move your arm normally, will be effected.

Now I’d like to introduce you to another important member of the medical team — the nurse.

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230 sec.

Heart – Stent Implantation Coronary Angioplasty PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a balloon angioplasty with a stent implant. But what does that actually mean?

The heart is located in the center of the chest. It’s job is to keep blood continually circulating throughout the body.

The blood vessels that supply the body with oxygen-rich blood are called arteries.
The arteries that supplies blood to the heart muscle itself are called coronary arteries.
Sometimes, these blood vessels can narrow or become blocked by plaque deposits, restricting normal blood flow.

In simple terms, a balloon angioplasty with stent insertion is a procedure used to increase the amount of blood flowing through the coronary artery.

During a balloon angioplasty, a heart specialist will insert a thin tube into an artery in your arm or leg and gently guide it towards the problem area in your heart.

Once the tube is in place, a small balloon is briefly inflated in order to widen the narrowed artery.

A short length of mesh tubing called a stent is then inserted into the newly widened artery.
During and after the procedure, your doctor will take x-rays in order to monitor your progress.

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Then the doctor will make a small cut over the femoral artery in the upper part of the leg.
A special needle is then inserted into the artery itself.
Then a guide wire is carefully passed through the needle and gently pushed into the artery
and upwards towards your chest.
A narrow tube, called a catheter is threaded along the wire until it too has reached the coronary artery
Next, the doctor uses the catheter to inject a dye into the artery itself. The die shows up on a TV monitor and is used to pinpoint the exact location of the blocked area.
Once the restricted area has been identified, a thin wire is inserted into the catheter, and is guided all the way to the blocked area and then slightly beyond.
This wire acts as guide for the balloon catheter. It allows your doctor to position the deflated balloon precisely in the middle of the narrowest part of the coronary artery.
The balloon is briefly inflated. As it expands, it squeezes the plaque deposits against the wall of the artery. It also stretches the artery wall and enlarges the channel through which blood flows.
Your doctor will continue to inflate and deflate the balloon until normal blood flow has been restored.
The balloon catheter is then withdrawn and another balloon catheter is inserted. This balloon has the mesh stent tube wrapped around it.
Once this tube has been placed in the center of now widened area of the artery, the balloon is briefly inflated. The stent expands until it hugs the walls of the artery.
Finally, after a thorough investigation of the region, the catheters and guide wire are withdrawn and the stent remains permanently to provide support to the artery and to resist the buildup of plaque.
The dye that had been injected will break up and leave your body as waste.
Slight pressure is applied to the incision in your leg in order to prevent bleeding.
344 sec.

Hip Replacement SurgeryPreOp® Patient Education HD

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You doctor has recommended that you undergo hip replacement surgery. But what exactly does that mean?

The hip joint is the place where the thighbone – called the femur – and the hipbone – called the pelvis – meet.

As you walk, the ball-shaped end of the thigh moves within a cuplike depression on the side of the hip.

As long as the thigh can move smoothly against the hip, you are able to walk comfortably. But over time, especially in patients who suffer from arthritis or rheumatism, the hip joint can wear down.

Cartilage, the tissue that cushions the bones and makes it possible for them to move smoothly against each other can wear away.

When this happens, the bones rub together causing pain and even restricting the ability to walk.
* In some cases, hip surgery is recommended for people who have suffered a hip fracture.
* No matter what the cause, one of the most effective ways to fix a damaged hip is to replace it surgically.

In this procedure, the ball-shaped bone at the top of the thigh is removed and replaced with a metal substitute.

The hip socket is widened and lined with a smooth pad that allows the metal ball joint to move more freely against the pelvis.

Hip replacement surgery is a major operation, but your doctor believes that the procedure — followed up with physical therapy and time to heal — will result in reduced pain and greater mobility.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth …
… and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will prepare by clipping or shaving skin around your hip and thigh.
The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia – probably general anesthesia by injection and inhalation mask.
The surgeon will then apply antiseptic solution to the skin …
… and place a sterile drape around the operative site.
Then, when you are asleep, the surgical team will make an incision over the hip and along the thigh.
The team will pull the skin aside to reveal the muscle tissue below.
They’ll then make another incision to reveal the hip joint.
Next, the team pulls the top of the thighbone…
… out of the hip socket.
Using a precision surgical saw,
your doctor will carefully remove the ball-shaped end of the thighbone.
Then, the surgical team will use a high-speed drill to hollow out the top of the thighbone.
A specially fitted artificial ball joint slides into the top of the thighbone.
Next, your doctor will smooth the inner surface of the hip socket.
Once the socket has been thoroughly cleaned, the artificial lining will be secured in place with special screws.
The artificial ball joint is turned inward and fit into the socket.
The team carefully checks to make sure that it fits and allows the full range of normal motion.
Muscle and other tissues are closed over the joint using dissolvable stitches. A temporary draining tube may be added.
Finally, the skin is closed with sutures…
… and protected with sterilized strips.

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319 sec.

Heart, Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you have coronary artery bypass surgery. But what does that actually mean?

Your heart is located in the center of your chest. It is surrounded by your rib cage and protected by your breastbone. Your heart’s job is to keep blood continually circulating throughout your body.
The vessels that supply the body with oxygen-rich blood are called arteries.

The vessels that return blood to the heart are called veins.
Like any other muscle in the body, the heart depends on a steady supply of oxygen rich blood. The arteries that carry this blood supply to the heart muscle are called coronary arteries.

Sometimes, these blood vessels can narrow or become blocked by deposits of fat, cholesterol and other substances collectively known as plaque.
Over time, plaque deposits can narrow the vessels so much that normal blood flow is restricted. In some cases, the coronary artery becomes so narrow that the heart muscle itself is in danger.

Coronary bypass surgery attempts to correct this serious problem. In order to restore normal blood flow, the surgeon removes a portion of a blood vessel from the patient’s leg or chest, most probably the left internal mammary artery and the saphenous vein.

Your doctor uses one or both of these vessels to bypass the old, diseased coronary artery and to build a new pathway for blood to reach the heart muscle. These transplanted vessels are called grafts and depending on your condition, your doctor may need to perform more than one coronary artery bypass graft.

Of course, operating on the heart is a complex and delicate process and in the case of bypass surgery, your doctor will most likely need to stop your heart before installing the graft.

During the time that your heart is not beating, a special machine, called a heart-lung machine, will take over the job of circulating and oxygenating your blood.
By using this machine, your doctor is able to repair the heart without interfering with the blood flow to the rest of the body.

Following surgery, your heart will be restarted and you will be disconnected from the heart-lung machine.

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One or more sections of blood vessel will be taken from the leg, thigh or chest wall and the incision at those points will be sutured and bandaged.
Then, your doctor will make a vertical incision in the center of the chest.
Skin and other tissue will be pulled back in order to expose the breast bone.
Your doctor will carefully divide the breast bone …
… and a special instrument called a retractor will be used to hold the chest open.
Once your doctor has a clear view of the heart, he or she will make an incision in the pericardium – a thin membrane that encloses the heart.
Pulling the pericardium back will reveal the beating heart. Before the graft vessel or vessels can be attached, a heart-lung machine must be connected, A heart lung machine takes over the job of circulating and oxygenating the blood so that your doctor will be free to stop your heart for the length of the operation.
To connect the heart-lung machine, one tube is placed into the aorta …
… and a second tube is placed into the right atrium of the heart.
One or two smaller tubes are then inserted into the heart.
These will carry a special solution that helps preserve the hearts temperature. When all the tubes are in place, the surgical team will turn on the bypass machine. It will begin to circulate the blood as the heart cools.
When the temperature of the heart muscle has reached the proper level, a clamp is placed on the aorta. At that point, blood will no longer flow through the heart and it can be safely stopped and repaired.
To complete the bypass graft procedure, your doctor attaches the ends of the new vessels on either side of the diseased area or areas of the old coronary artery.
Once the grafts have been completed, the clamp on the aorta is removed and the heart is allowed to begin beating again.
As the temperature and the rhythm of the heart slowly return to normal, the heart-lung machine is disconnected.
The pericardium can now be closed over the heart.
Your doctor will position two special drainage tubes in the chest cavity. These tubes prevent fluid from building up around the heart during the healing process.
The breast bone is then closed with metal wire …
… and the remaining tissue is closed with sutures.
Finally a sterile bandage is applied.
555 sec.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery PreOp® Patient Education

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Before we talk about treatment, let’s start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition.

Your doctor has recommended that you have surgery to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm. But what does that actually mean?
The aorta is the main blood vessel that carries oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the organs in your body.
An aneurysm is a bulge or swelling in a blood vessel.
This type of bulge occurs when a blood clot … or blood clots develop in the aorta, causing to expand.
In your case, your doctor has determined that a portion of the aorta passing through your abdomen – the area between your legs and your chest – has developed a blood clot. In most cases these clots are caused by fatty deposits that build up inside the arteries.
Aneurysms are dangerous because the blood clot weakens the blood vessel and can cause it to burst.
The surgery your doctor has recommended will remove the blood clot …
… and reinforce the weakened wall of the aorta.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

your doctor will make a vertical incision down the center of your abdomen.
Skin and other tissue will be pulled back in order to expose the abdominal muscles.
Your doctor will carefully divide the muscle in order to expose the abdominal cavity. A special instrument called a retractor will be used to hold the chest open.
Once your doctor has a clear view of the abdomen he or she will gently pull the intestines up and out of the way …
… revealing the aorta and the aneurysm. Now your doctor can begin to remove the clot.
First, he or she will apply clamps to each of the two arteries that branch away from the main artery – temporarily preventing blood from flowing to your legs.
Next, your doctor will clamp the artery above the aneurysm.
Once the blood supply has been shut off in this manner, your doctor will make a vertical incision in the artery wall …
… and two small horizontal incisions to allow access to the damaged area.
The blood clot can then be removed. The surgical team will sew together any damaged blood vessels inside the aorta.
A tube made of a sterile synthetic material can now be inserted into the vessel to provide support and reinforcement.
It is then sewn into place.
One by one your doctor will remove the clamps, restoring blood flow to the legs.
After verifying there are no leaks around the surgical field, the team will finally close the vessel with sutures.
Your doctor will restore all internal organs to their proper positions.
The muscles and other tissue can then be closed with sutures.
Finally, the skin is closed with staples and a sterile dressing is applied.
313 sec.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Repair Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo hand surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome. But what exactly is carpal tunnel syndrome?

The median nerve, which carries sensation to the thumb and first three fingers, passes through a natural passageway in the wrist. This opening – called the carpal tunnel is formed by arch-shaped wrist bones and a connecting ligament.

Various conditions, such as pregnancy, injury, arthritis and changes in the tendons caused by repetitive motion can crowd the already narrow tunnel, putting pressure on the nerve.

This added pressure can cause a tingling sensation in the fingers and the thumb and may even lead to numbness, pain and restricted movement. This combination of symptoms is called the carpal tunnel syndrome.

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On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth and
an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to the operating table.
Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the incision will be made.
Next, the surgeon will numb the involved area of the hand and wrist with an anesthetic, either with a local injection or by completely blocking a nerve higher up on the arm.
When the operative field is completely numb the surgeon will make an incision.
Skin and other tissue will be carefully drawn aside to expose the carpal ligament. Patient Education
Then the surgeon will cut the ligament,
relieving pressure on the nerve that runs beneath it.
Finally the doctor will close the incision with fine sutures.
A sterile bandage will be applied and a splint will be put in place to prevent the wrist from moving while healing takes place.

Following the procedure, you’ll be moved then to a recovery area where you can relax until the sedation and anesthetic has worn off – and until the doctor is satisfied that you are fit to go home. Plan on spending several hours in recovery. Your doctor may be able to give you a more precise estimate prior to surgery.

Before you leave, you’ll probably be prescribed a pain killer along with any other medication your doctor feels you need to take.

Carpal tunnel repair surgery only rarely leads to complications.

In a very small number of cases, surgery can result in tendon or nerve damage,

causing discomfort …

… or reduced hand function.

You should notice improvement soon after surgery, but you may experience some minor pain or tenderness during healing.

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Once you return home, you will be responsible to keeping the dressing intact and clean.

As with all surgery, you should be alert for signs of infection near the incision – increased swelling, redness, bleeding or other discharge. Your doctor may advise you to be on the alert for other symptoms as well. If you experience any unusual symptoms, report them to your doctor right away.

You may also notice some bruising in the general area of the incision. The discoloration may be extensive – but as with any bruise, it should heal on it’s own.

Before you leave, you’ll be given discharge guidelines which may include diet, medication, work and other activity restrictions.
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You’ll also make at least one follow-up appointment so that the doctor will be able to check the healing of the incision and/or to remove sutures.

This program has been designed to help you to understand a surgical procedure and to empower you to be an active participant in your own care. We hope that you take the time to discuss alternative treatments with your doctor and that you learn as much as you can about your own particular medical situation.

We also want to make sure that you understand all the risks of surgery and potential complications which can follow – no matter how unlikely they may be.

It’s important that you understand exactly what the procedure entails – including the risks, benefits and alternative treatments – before you decide to proceed.

Always remember that the final decision to go ahead or not is up to you.

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194 sec.

Gastric Bypass Open Weight Loss Surgery PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo gastric bypass surgery. But what exactly does that mean?

Gastric Bypass is a surgical procedure used to help a patient lose weight. It is usually recommended to help those who are morbidly obese – meaning that their weight problem has become a serious health risk.

Most severely overweight patients overeat.

Food enters the body through the mouth, travels down the esophagus where it collects in the stomach.

From there, digested food passes into the small intestine. Nutrients taken from the food pass from the small intestine into the bloodstream.

Waste travels to the colon and leaves the body through the anus.
The amount of food that a person eats is partly controlled by appetite.The stomach plays an important role in controlling appetite. When the stomach is empty, a person feels the urge to eat. When the stomach is full, that urge goes away.

Gastric bypass dramatically reduces the size of the stomach. With a smaller stomach, the patient is physically unable to eat large amounts of food. Gastric Bypass also shortens the small intestine so that the body absorbs less of the food eaten.

With less food entering the body, fat stores begin to be used. The patient loses weight.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

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the surgical team will make a vertical incision down the middle of your abdomen.
They will gently pull back the skin to expose the connective tissue beneath.
Your doctor will then divide this tissue,
… and the underlying muscle tissue to expose the abdominal cavity.
Your doctor will gently lift the liver up and to the side to reveal the stomach.
Your doctor will then cut the upper portion of the stomach from the rest of the organ.
This upper portion forms a small pouch, which is sealed with a stapling tool. The opening in the larger portion of the stomach is closed with staples.
The next step is to divide the small intestine.
The main part of the intestine is pulled upward, behind the colon and positioned near the small upper stomach pouch.
The other free end of the intestine is surgically stitched to the side of an intestinal loop.
The other end is now attached to the small stomach pouch. A new route for food passing from the esophagus into the intestines has now been created.
Finally, your doctor will check to make sure that all the new connections are secure and that there are no leaks. The liver and other organs are placed in their proper positions.
A drain is put in place to remove any excess fluids … Then the team closes the surgical field by joining the muscles with sutures.
Then the connective tissues are closed. The skin is sutured together and the incision is closed.
Finally, a sterile dressing is applied.

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315 sec.

Heart – Cardiac Catheterization Angiography PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a cardiac catheterization. But what does that actually mean?

The heart is located in the center of the chest. It’s job is to keep blood continually circulating throughout the body.

The blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood away from the heart are called arteries.

The largest and most important of these is the aorta.

The vessels that bring blood back into the heart are called veins.

Sometimes, these blood vessels can grow narrower or become blocked in such a way that normal blood flow is restricted. In simple terms, a cardiac catheterization is a diagnostic procedure used when your doctor believes that blood is not flowing normally in and or around your heart.

In simple terms, a cardiac catheterization is a diagnostic procedure used when your doctor believes that blood is not flowing normally in and or around your heart.

During a cardiac catheterization, a heart specialist will insert a thin tube into an artery in the arm or leg and gently guide it towards the problem area in the heart.

Once the tube is in place, a special dye is injected and a series of x-rays are taken.

These x-rays allow your doctor to see exactly how blood is flowing in your heart.

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Then the doctor will make a small cut over the femoral artery in the upper part of the leg.
A special needle is then inserted into the artery itself.
Then a guide wire is carefully passed through the needle and gently pushed into the artery and upwards towards your chest.
Once the wire’s in place at the aorta, a narrow tube, called a catheter, is threaded along the wire until it too has reached the aorta.
The guide wire will then be withdrawn, leaving the catheter in place.
Next, the doctor injects a dye – specially designed to show up under x-rays. The dye will outline the blood vessels that feed that heart and will allow your doctor to pinpoint areas where blood flow has been reduced.
After a thorough investigation, the catheter is withdrawn…
and slight pressure is applied to the incision in your leg in order to prevent bleeding. The dye that was injected will break up and leave your body as waste.

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Heart -Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG off-pump) PreOp® Patient Education HD

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Now it’s time to talk about the actual procedure your doctor has recommended for you.

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.
You may receive a sedative by mouth …
… and an intravenous line may be put in.
You will then be transferred to an operating table.
In the operating room, a nurse will begin preparation by clipping or shaving the chest area and the part of the body from which the graft vessel or vessels will be removed.
The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia – most probably general anesthesia by injection and inhalation mask.
The surgeon will then apply an antiseptic solution to the skin …
… and place a sterile drape around the operative site.
One or more sections of blood vessel will be taken from the leg, thigh or chest wall and the incision at those points will be sutured and bandaged.
Then, your doctor will make a vertical incision in the center of the chest.
Skin and other tissue will be pulled back in order to expose the breast bone.
Your doctor will carefully divide the breast bone …
… and a special instrument called a retractor will be used to hold the chest open.
Once your doctor has a clear view of the heart, he or she will make an incision in the pericardium – a thin membrane that encloses the heart.
Pulling the pericardium back will reveal the beating heart.
Next, the surgeon will gently rotate the heart to the right in order to allow access to the heartâ??s underside.
Using veins taken from another part of your body, the team will begin to build new paths for blood â?? bypassing the blocked areas of the old artery or arteries. The team will attach as many new veins as needed to the underside of the heart.
Then, the doctor will gently rotate the heart back to its normal position.
To complete the bypass graft procedure, your doctor attaches the ends of the new veins on either side of the diseased area or areas of the old coronary artery. Blood can now flow freely â?? avoiding the clogged areas that had caused your symptoms.
The pericardium can now be closed over the heart.
Your doctor will position two special drainage tubes in the chest cavity.
These tubes prevent fluid from building up around the heart during the healing process.
The breast bone is then closed with metal wire …
… and the remaining tissue is closed with sutures.
Finally a sterile bandage is applied.

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